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Porch Flooring Installation - Part 2

Handling Corners, Rim Boards, and Thresholds

In this section (Part 2) of our porch flooring installation series courtesy of Vintage Woodworks, their video shows how to install boards at a corner, how to address rim board issues, and how to install boards under a threshold.



Normally, boards are mitered and butted against each other at a corner. However, Vintage Woodworks describes a bit different method that results in a much cleaner and more professional look.

Watch their video below to learn how easy this is to do and for other tips that will make the job a lot easier.





Video Summary

We are including a summary of the video transcript for those unable to see the video and so you can refer back to the information at your convenience.

In Porch Decking Part 1, Vintage Woodworks showed how to resolve foundation issues. In this section (Part 2), they address a few other important factors.

Working A Corner

If you have a wrap-around porch you will need to join boards at the corner. Traditionally, boards are mitered against each other. However, here's another way to handle a corner that results in a cleaner look.

diagonal porch board




By using a diagonal floor board at the corner you can butt the porch boards directly against the diagonal board rather than each other. This creates a much cleaner and more professional look.

diagonal porch board




Be aware; however, you may need to attach additional blocking (as shown in the photo below) to support and attach the ends of the floor boards.



rim board



Dave's Note: If using treated lumber rather than AZEK porch boards (which don't shrink), I like to ensure the blocking is of sufficient width to accommodate screwing the floor board straight down into the treated wood rather than toe nailing the board on the ends.

Treated lumber has a tendency to shrink on the ends and often times the toe nailed screws split the ends of the boards over time.

AZEK building products include a full line of rim board covers and porch decking materials. All are available through Vintage Woodworks.


Rim Joist Issues

rim board Rim joists made from treated lumber can deteriorate because they take the brunt of weather. The rim boards on this porch are proof that weather takes a toll.

They had been painted but the surfaces deteriorated and the corner joints were no longer tight.



rim board




The owners decided to cover their rim joists with painted ¾ inch AZEK trim boards. Because they are made from cellular PVC, they mimic the look of real wood but they won't rot. AZEK also makes rim joist covers to match their porch boards so you can have continuity of color. For this project, the rim joists were painted to match the house trim.

They wanted to avoid the issue of damaged wood caused by the weather and opted for a slightly more expense option, the AZEK cellular PVC products. By doing so, they alleviate any future water issues and over time, possibly save money in replacement costs.

Creating An Overhang

You will want your new porch floor to extend past your rim joist by at least an inch.

overhang 1 inch




To achieve this consistently across your porch floor, you will have to account for width of the rim joist plus 1 inch. They show you two popular methods.

The first method uses a string line. Set a string line 1 3/4 inches (3/4 inch rim board plus 1 inch overhang) from the edge of the rim board. Install your porch boards to that line without touching it. Pay particular attention to the string as any movement, by the boards or by other means, may cause the boards to be out of line. This method requires cutting each board to the exact length prior to installation.

overhang 1 inch




Another method, and probably the most popular and quickest, is to install the porch flooring longer than needed to get the 1-inch overhang. Then cut the ends to the right length with a circular saw. Just be careful to not cut them too short as there would be no easy remedy. Snap a chalk line to mark the cut.

marking and cutting overhang




Not everyone can accurately cut against a chalk line. You can also use a straight edge against which you will place the bottom edge of the circular saw. Watch the chalk line as you cut to ensure your cut is accurate.

overhang 1 inch



Dave's Note: For safety reasons, I prefer to use a long straight board as a guide in similar situations. I position the board and then tack it down on each end (sometimes the middle depending on length) or clamp it in place if feasible. I prefer not to have my toes or hands near the rotating blade of a circular saw nor do I recommend you do so either.


Thresholds

The first board had to fit under the kitchen door threshold. If your new porch boards are the same thickness as the old ones, you shouldn't have any issue sliding the new one under the threshold.

overhang 1 inch




However, in this case, the new boards are thicker which is usually the case. Instead of removing the door casing and door jamb to reset it higher to accommodate the new board, it is easier to cut the new board to fit. By cutting a 3/8 inch rabbit (groove) on the top edge of the new board, the board can slip under the threshold.

Before installing the board under the threshold, caulk the edge of the board. Owners used BASF brand sonolastic NP1 caulk for the edge and also under the front bottom edge of the threshold.


Dave's Note: You can cut the rabbit using a router or a table saw. I've provided two diagrams to illustrate the cut and placement of the board.

overhang 1 inch




overhang 1 inch






In Porch Flooring Part 3, learn how to square your porch in order to install the porch flooring.

See All of Vintage Woodwork's Porch Flooring Videos
(You just saw #2)

corner boards
Part 1
Foundation Preparation

read more
corner boards
Part 2
Corners, Thresholds, and Rim Boards
read more
squaring your porch
Part 3
Squaring Your Porch

read more



installing porch boards
Part 4
Installing Porch Boards

read more
finished porch floor
Part 5
Finishing the Floor

read more





Disclaimer: The information provided here is for informational purposes only. Because every project is different and individual DIY skills vary, it's best to consult a licensed contractor about your specific project.





/ / / / Porch Flooring 2






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